iv) Door

In previous sections, we have covered the inspections of floor, wall and ceiling. Essentially these cover the core surface areas of any house. In the next 2 sections, we would cover the supplementary components that are usually attached to the walls and sometimes to the floor or ceiling namely doors (this section) and windows (next section).

In this section, we would go through the inspection of the door. Before we proceed, it is fundamental to note that different materials are often used for the different doors in the house. Front main and room doors are typically made of solid timber, veneer, or laminate to provide a more solid feel to the entrance to these rooms while balcony doors are made of aluminium and glass to permit an open concept and added durability to outdoor elements such as rain and sun. On the other hand, tempered glass or PVC are often used for doors to toilet or shower areas where water resistance is needed. Depending on the material used for the door, you may want to make sure the door inspection is done in accordance to the nature of the material and how the door is fixed to the frame.

For a start, the joints of the door frame to both the floor and the wall should be consistent and free from any visible gap. The mitre (or the joint made by 2 pieces coming together at 45 degree to form a corner) joint should also be neat and consistent. In the case of glass door, sealant would need to be applied in an uniform and consistent manner with no excess on the glazing or frame.

When the door is closed, a small gap is expected but this gap between the door and the frame as well as the door and the floor should be consistent. Both the door and the frame should also be aligned and inspect the door leaf and the frame for any bend or warp.

Door - Joints not flushed with one another
Door - Joints not flushed with one another

 

 

 

 

 

 

For swing or sliding door, the door should open/close or slide along the track smoothly.

Next, inspect the door and the frame for any visible damages like cracks, dents, scratch marks. Put in more effort in the case of glass door or frame as usually such damages might lead to a much bigger problem affecting the whole door or frame given the "scattering" nature of glass. Any painting and varnishing on door or frame should be uniform and consistent with no excessive brush marks.

Door - Cracks
Door - Cracks
Door - Chip Offs
Door - Chip Offs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Components like peep-hole, lock, knob, handle, latch, door stopper, door closer, hinges, screws etc... must be well fitted and free from rust and stains. It is essential for these to be operated smoothly and easily especially the locking mechanism. There should be no squealing sound where the presence indicates parts subjected to excessive friction or simply poorly oiled.

Door - Tarnished Peephole
Door - Tarnished Peephole
Door - Ill-fitted Hinge
Door - Ill-fitted Hinge
Door - Ill-fitted screws
Door - Ill-fitted screws
Door - Rusty Hinge
Door - Rusty Hinge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Door - Rusty Handle
Door - Rusty Handle
Door - Scratch Marks
Door - Scratch Marks

 

 

 

 

 

 

In summary, the following are the key areas to look out for when checking for door defects:

  1. Joints should be consistent and free from any visible gap
  2. Mitre joints should be neat and consistent
  3. Sealant should be applied uniformly
  4. Gap between door and floor/wall should be consistent when closed
  5. Door and frame should be aligned
  6. Door should open/close or slide along the track smoothly
  7. No visible damages like cracks, dents, scratch marks
  8. Any painting and varnishing on door or frame should be uniform and consistent with no excessive brush marks
  9. Components should be well fitted and free from rust and stains
  10. Components should operated smoothly and easily
  11. No squealing sound